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5 edition of The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution) found in the catalog.

The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution)

by Michael P. Hassell

  • 138 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press, USA .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Number of Pages208
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7400775M
ISBN 100198540892
ISBN 109780198540892

This paper explores the effect of spatial processes in a heterogeneous environment on the dynamics of a host-parasitoid interaction. The environment consists of a lattice of favourable (habitat) and hostile (matrix) hexagonal cells, whose spatial distribution is measured by habitat proportion and spatial autocorrelation (inverse of fragmentation). This address illustrates how the dynamics of host–parasitoid interactions may be influenced by three major ecological processes: by spatial patchi-ness, by interactions with other species, and by metapopulation structure. A common underlying theme is that parasitism does not occur at random and that spatial and other processes lead to aggre-Cited by:

Introduction. Parasitoids are a hugely diverse group, in which hymenopteran parasitoids alone are thought to number at least , species (Pennacchio and Strand ).Generalist parasitoids that prey on a range of host species are a key component of many insect communities (Janssen ), and the particular host preferences that generalist parasitoids exhibit can have major implications for Cited by: The deterministic dynamics of this and other nest parasites are therefore likely to be remarkably stable, perhaps even ‘boring’, by host–parasitoid standards. Given this expected deterministic stability, one of the most surprising results was that we could detect consistent signals of the parasite–host interaction (albeit often weak and Cited by:

The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution) by Michael P. Hassell Kindle Edition. Spatial structure can have a profound, but often underappreciated, effect on the temporal dynamics of ecosystems. Here we report on a counterintuitive increase in the population of a tree-nesting ant, Azteca sericeasur, in response to a drastic reduction in the number of potential nesting sites. This surprising result is comprehensible when viewed in the context of the self-organized spatial Cited by: 7.


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The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution) by Michael P. Hassell Download PDF EPUB FB2

Download Citation | The Spatial And Temporal Dynamics Of Host-Parasitoid Interactions | Follows up his book with a review of more recent work.

| Find, read and cite all the research you need. This book examines our current understanding of the population dynamics of one kind of interaction--that between insect parasitoids and their hosts.

Parasitoids are amongst the most abundant of all animals, and make up about 10% or more of metazoan species. Almost no insect species escape their attack. The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution) 1st Edition, Kindle Edition by Michael P.

Hassell (Author) › Visit Amazon's Michael P. Hassell Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Cited by: Buy The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions Books online at best prices in India by Michael P Hassell from Buy The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions online of India’s Largest Online Book Store, Only Genuine Products.

Lowest price and Replacement Guarantee. Cash On Delivery Available. Buy The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions Books online at best prices in India by Michael P Hassell,Michael (Department of Biology, Imperial College at Silwood Park) Hassell from Buy The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions online of India’s Largest Online Book Store, Only Genuine Products.

This text examines advances in our understanding of the population dynamics of interactions between insect parasitoids and their hosts. Topics addressed include how host-parasitoid interactions are influenced by spatial processes, by age-structure effects, and by competition from other species.

A thorough review of models of host–parasitoid interactions is beyond the scope of this chapter (see instead Hassell,or Hassell and Waage, ).Here I consider only spatial heterogeneity in parasitoid attack rates relative to host densities, which is perhaps the most intensively studied mechanism that is capable of stabilizing host–parasitoid interactions.

Fundamentally, the appearance of spatio-temporal heterogeneity suggests that dispersive host–parasitoid interactions will exhibit spatial variation, a fact that has been reported in the literature (Hassell and Wilson,Sherratt et al., ).

Our model highlights the wide range of dynamics that arise from the interplay of spatial random Cited by: Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity of Host-Parasitoid Interactions in Lupine Habitat Abstract The inhabitants of the bush lupine in coastal California have been the subject of scienti c scrutiny in recent years.

Observations of a host-parasitoid interaction in the shrub’s foliage, in which victims are signi cantly less motile than their.

The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host–Parasitoid Interactions M. Hassell Oxford University Press: pp. £, $70 (hbk); £, $ (pbk)Author: Ted J. Case. Access Google Sites with a free Google account (for personal use) or G Suite account (for business use).

When spatial interactions are also taken into considera-tion via random motility of each of the four species, a system of four partial differential equations is obtained which models the spatio-temporal dynamics of our four species host–parasitoid community.

In this paper, we consider the interactions of the two hosts and two. The spatial and temporal dynamics of host parasitoid interactions pdf Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website.

Parasitoids have the potential to suppress populations of their hosts and thus may play an 2 important role in influencing the temporal and spatial dynamics of pest arthropods. 3 Behavioural. Key-words: heterogeneity, dispersal, host-parasitoid, spatial dynamics. Journal of Animal Ecology (), 61, Introduction There is now a large body of literature showing that spatially patchy environments can markedly influence the dynamics of species interactions.

This is true whether one considers the dynamics of single species. Abstract. In this paper we develop a general mathematical model describing the spatio-temporal dynamics of host-parasitoid systems with forced generational synchronisation, for example seasonally induced by: Download The Ecological Consequences Of Host Density Dependence And Parasitoid Fecundity For Host Parasitoid Population Dynamics ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, The Spatial And Temporal Dynamics Of Host Parasitoid Interactions.

Author: Michael Hassell ISBN: Parasitoids lay their eggs on or in the bodies of other species of insect, and the parasitoid larvae develop by feeding on the host, causing its eventual death.

Known for a long time to applied biologists for their importance in regulating the population densities of economic pests, parasitoids have recently proven to be valuable tools in testing many aspects of evolutionary theory.

In this study of arthropod predador-prey systems Michael Hassell shows how many of the components of predation may be simply modeled in order to reveal their effects on the overall dynamics of the interacting populations. Arthropods, particularly insects, make ideal subjects for such a study because their generation times are characteristically short and many have relatively discrete.

connectivity and the spatial and temporal population dynamics of this host–parasitoid interaction. METHODS Life history Prokelisia crocea is a monophagous phloem-feeder and dominant herbivore of prairie cordgrass throughout the plant species’ range (Holder and WilsonCro-nin a, b). In North Dakota, planthoppers overwin.

Mathematical modeling of the spatio-temporal dynamics of aphid-parasitoid-plant-virus interactions Author: Ananthi Anandanadesan1 Supervisors and Collaborators: Professor Mark Chaplain1, Dr.

Steve Hubbard2, Dr. Alison Karley3, Dr. Pieta Schofield2 1Department of Mathematics, University of Dundee 2School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee 3James Hutton Institute, Invergowrie, DundeeCited by: 1.The Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Host-Parasitoid Interactions; Oxford University Press: Oxford, UK, [ Google Scholar ] Briggs, C.J.; Hoopes, M.F.

Stabilizing effects in spatial parasitoid-host and predator-prey models: A by: 1.a novel mathematical model of host}parasitoid interaction that explicitly models the e!ects of space and spatial behaviour on the interactions and hence on the dynamics of a host}parasitoid system.

We develop and extend a technique pre-viously used for modelling nematode movement in soil (Anderson, ), and endothelial cell.